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To Lord Wentworth
                                              London, April 17, 1634.

Wentworth,

                The great dispatch that your brother brought me has given me so much satisfaction, that I could not but testify it by my own hand. Though I know you will find my public letters enough to your contentment, and full enough to make this short, yet there is one general and one particular that I will name to you, to take care of, to wit, the Parliament and Arundel; in a word, to content them both, so far as may not be to my prejeduce. As for Arundel, I need say no more; but as for that Hydra, take good heed, for you know that here I have found it as well cunning as malicious. It is true that your grounds are well laid, and, I assure you, that I have a great tgrust in your care and judgement; yet my opinion is, that it will not be the worse for my service, though their obstinacy make you to break them, for I fear they have some ground more than it is fit for me to give. This I would not say, if I had not confidence in your courage and dexterity; that, in that case, you would set me down there an example what to do here.  So I rest,

                             Your assured friend,
                                         
                                                 Charles R.

In reply to Wentworth's request for an earldom.

To Lord Wentworth

                 Hampton Court, October 23, 1634

Wentworth,

          Before I answer any of your particular letters to me, I must tell you, that your last public dispatch has given me a great deal of contentment, and especially for keeping off the envy of a neccessary negative from me, of those unreasonable graces that the people expected from me, not in one particular dissenting from your opinion (that is of moment, as I remember) but concerning the tallow, and that but ad referendum neither.
          Now I will begin concerning your suit, though last come to my hands; and the first for the form, that is to say, in coming to me not only primarliy but solely without so much as acquainting anybody with it, the bearer being as ignorant as any. This I do not only commend, but recommend you to follow always hereafter at least in what concerns your own particular; for, to servants of your quality (and some degrees under too), I allow of no mediators, though friends are commendable; for the dependence must come merely from me and to me; and as for the matter, I desire you not to think that I am despleased with the asking, though for the present I grant it not. For I acknowledge that noble minds are alwasys accompanied with lawful ambitions; and be confident that your services have moved me more than it is possible for any eloquence or importunity to do. So that your letter was not the first proposer of putting marks of favour on you; and I am certain that you willingly stay my time, now you know my mind so freely, that I may do all things a mi modo; and so I rest,
                                                             Your assured friend,
                                                                             Charles R.

Wentworth had secured substantial grants from the Irish parliament for the crown. He wished only to dismiss parilament in Ireland and not to dissolve it completely.

To Lord Wentworth
                                          London, January 22, 1635.
Wentworth

           The accounts that you give me are so good, that if I should answer them particularly, my letters would rather seem panegyrics than dispatches; so leaving them I come to those things wherein you require directions. And although I shall refer myself to secretary Coke for an answer of those things that are in the public dispatches, yet concerning two of them I must express my own sense, to wit, the not continuing of the Parliament and the guard of the coast. For the first, my reasons are grounded upon my experience of them here; they are of the nature of cats, that ever grow cursed with age, so that if you will have good of them, put them off handsomely when they come to any age; for young ones are ever most tractable; and, in earnest, you will find that nothing can more conduce to the beginning of a new than the well ending of a former Parliament: wherefore, now that we are well, let us content ourselves therewith.
          I have read and considered your proposition for the guarding of the Irish coast, and (upon one condition) like it very well; that they should be subordinate and accountable to the Admiralty here: for (by your favour) I do not hold it fit to sever the jurisdiction of the sea. So that if you can make it good with this condition, I shall esteem it a very good service; only I pray let us not imitate the King of Spain in the sea of discipline.
         Concerning Fort Inoland, since my last to you...speaking with me about Irish affairs, put me in mind of some engagements I had to...about this. but whether it were absolute or on condition of his finding it on his own charge, I do not now well remember; wherefore, go on to put it into my hands, and then, as I shall find my engagement and the fitness of the thing. I shall dispose of it accordingly; only see that none in the meantime, upon whatsoever pretence, snatch it up.
         As for the reserved rent you put upon the new plantations, I like it well, and that no undertaker should have too great a proportion. But now I desire that you send me particularly the number or acres I am this time to dispose of, as also, by way of atricles, the conditions that I am to tie every undertaker to perform.
        For the tallow, I can assure you that, for anything I know, you are misinformed, for I never heard you taxed to have a private end in it; but indeed I think you are mistaken in the business; but I leave the disputing part of it to others.
       Lastly, I forgot in my last to satisfy you that what I did concerning the stopping of the horse and foot companies that last fell, was not by court importunity, for the truth is, that I intend it for Jacob Astley. I say this to no other end than to clearr you that there was no practice in the thing to your disadvantage, as likewise to desire you to put me in mind when anything shall fall in that kingdom fit for me to give such a man; for I have had this long time a desire to call him home to my service. So having answered, as I think, all your dispatch, I assure you likewise that I sahall not fail to answer your services in being really
         
                                   Your most assured friend,

                                                             Charles Rex.

Wentworth asked the King's permission to come to England.

To Lord Wentworth
                                              Lyndhurst, September 3, 1636
Wentworth
       Certainly I should be much to blame not to admit so good a servant as you are to speak with me, since I deny it to none there is not a just exception against, yet I must freely tell you, that the cause of this desire of yours, if it be known, will rather hearten than discourage your enemies; for, if they can once find that you apprehend the dark setting of a storm, when I say no, they will make you leave to care for anything in a short while but for you fears. And, believe it, the marks of my favours that stop malicious tongues are neither places nor titles, but the little welcome I give to accusers, and the willing ear I give to my servants. This is not to desparage those favours (for envy flies most at the fairest mark) but to show their use; to wit, not to quell envy, but to reward service; it being truly so, when the master without the servant's importunity does it otherwise, men judge it more to proceed from the servant's wit, than the master's favour.
      I will end with a rule that may serve for a statesman, a coutier, or a lover - never make a defence or apoloogy before you be accused. And so I rest,
                                                                      Your assured friend,
                                                                                           Charles R.

Wentworth was not supportive of Charles's intention to restore his sister to the throne of Bohemia.

To Lord Wentworth
                                                               Theobalds, June 1, 1637.

Wentworth,

      I thought it not necessary to reply to yours of the 31st of March, because the occasion is not, as I think, very near; but I would not be too long without writing to you, and the rather to tell you, that I am now resolved to take the lands, and not the money, from the Londoners. For I will not lose, for the use of a little present money, so good a bargain, though I confess I imagined the lands were more worth than I find by your letters that they are.
     Now to end with that purpose, I begin withal, I thank you for your considerations concerning war and peace; but, by your favour, you mistake the question. For it is not whether I should declare war to the House of Austria or not, but whether I shall join with France and the rest of my friends to demand of the House of Austria my nephew's restitution, and so hazard (upon refusal) a declaration of war. Howsoever, your conclusion is very good, and I shall follow the advice therin, with as much judgement as God has given me. And so I rest,
                                            Your assured friend,
                                                          Charles R.

The King is referring to assistance from Ireland with the Bishop's wars. Wentworth doubted the wisdom or arming the Irish.

To Lord Wentworth
                                                 Woodstock, August 30, 1638.
Wentworth,
     Though I am in debt to you for three letters, yet there is little to answer, most of them being narrations, and for that which concerns the army, because your despatch to secretary Coke made me direct him fully in that particular, I refer you to him; so that I conceive there rests nothing but the particular of the Earl of Antrim to answer, whose professions have been so free and noble at this time, that (as I have promised) indeed, he desserves to be recommended unto you, which at his coming over to you, I wish you to take notice of to him. But to have the command of a magazine of arms, I leave to you and the council there to judge how far you will trust any one of that kind, of his profession in religion. To conclude this, I would have you favour and countenance him as much as any one of his profession in religion. There is one other at this time which I am to recommend unto you of a far different humour, to wit, the Lord Castle Stewart, whom reallly I leave you to judge whether he or his suit be fit to be favoured, or not; only this, his mother's son deserves to be countenanced if his comportments merit not the contrary. So farewell.
                                              your assured friend,
                                                         Charles Rex.

To Lord Wentworth

Wentworth,
     Some months ago I wrote to know of you what assistance I might expect from thence to curb the rebels in Scotland. The expectation of which (because I found by your answer, to be so difficult to be had, and likewise of no great consequence being had) I have relinquished so far, as not to build much upon those hopes; yet I have thought upon one particular, wherin I  think you may do me no small service to the aforesaid end, to wit, the securing of Carlisle, for the doing of which, five hundred men, well provided, will serve. Wherefore I desire you to send me word, first if you can do this? then, how soon? with caution of highest secrecy; for you must find some other pretext for the providing and transporting of those men. I would know, like-wise, what cannon you could spare or lend to this purpose. So expecting a speedy and  I hope a good answer of this letter, I rest,
                                                                 Your assured friend,
                                                                                 Charles Rex.



If this be feasible, lose no time in providing all things necessary, that you may be ready at the first warning from me.   To Lord Wentworth
                                                                  Whitehall, November 21, 1638.
Wentworth,
       Though your letter of the 11th of this month was long, yet was it neither tedious nor unpleasing to me (for good council and cheerful obeying of my commands cannot but be always acceptable to me), nor will it require a long answer, you have set this business in so good a way; for I fully approve of all your ways of preparation - wit, the way of levy, the pretence of it, the distribution of the companies, and the arms and the port you have named of their landing. But for the pay of the common soldier, it must not be augmented; for I must keep all the men I use in this service under one establishment, which I have resolved to be after the Holland pay; yet something may be done for them by way of conduct money, considering their long march. I give you willing leave to raise five hundred new foot to supply the want of others, and thank you for your willing undertaking of this new charge. Now for the leading of these men, I am so far from altering, that I thank you for naming Sir Frank Willoughby; and in the general command of those parts, I assure you, I shall not forget my Lord Clifford.
     Now, having answered your letter, I have little more to say at this time, but to mention Sir Jacob Astley to you in two respects: the first, to tell you that I have trusted him with all the secrets of this business, and have appointed him sergeant-major-general for the northern parts. The other is, that in respect I mean to use his service in this kingdom, I have made him refuse that employment you appointed for him there, to show that I wll give no man dispensation to live from his charge, and so I rest

                                                                      Your assured friend,
                                                                                      Charles REX.


I must not forget to tell you, that as I am glad to hear you have a good store of gunpowder; so that when you want, I expect you should furnish yourself from hence.          C.R.

As I cannot expect you can be sooner ready than two months, so I hope at that time to find you ready at furthest.                  C.R.   To Lord Wentworth

                                                            Whitehall, January 25, 1639.
Wentworth
        This is to advertise you, that at last I have taken a resolution concerning Carlisle and Berwick (Which by the grace of God I will not alter. For the first, I need only to set you down the time, the way be so well laid already, that I will not change it), which is, the first of April next for your five hundred men to be in Carlisle. For by that time I am confident both to have twelve hundred men in Berwick, and to be ready to march, at a day's warning, with ten thousand foot and fifteen hundred hourse to relieve either place. Only this I must add to my former directions that your men may bring with them bread and cheese for sixteen days after their landing, with this quaere, whether Carlisle may not be conveniently victualled from Ireland or no? I do not mean that the Irish exchequer should pay fort it. For you know that Westmorland, Cumberland, and Northumberland are ill stored with those provisions. Lastly, I should be glad if you could find some way to furnish the Earl of Antrim with arms, though he be a Roman Catholick; for he may be of much use to me at this time to shake loose upon the Earl of Argyll, of which particulars none of my secretaries at this time are acquainted with, wherefore the answer of this must come immediately to

                                                                              Your assured friend,
                                                                                              Charles R.

                                                                                February 25, 1639.
Wentworth,
     Yours of the 10th of this month came to my hands this morning, but for the present I shall only answer one part of it - to wit, concerning the five hundred which are to go to Carlisle. You know that it is fit that Berwick and it should be possessed at the same time. Now, I thought I might have done it by the 1st of April; but I find it will be the 8th before this of Berwick can be performed; therefore I will not have you embark your men neither sooner nor later than the 28th of this next month. So thanking you for all the ways of your hearty expression to my service at this time, I rest.

                                                   Your assured friend,
                                                                     Charles R.

Wentworth did not get the letter until March 14.    If this young lord [probably lord Grandison] be as diligent with you as he hath been with me, you will have no cause to complain of his negligence; and indeed I like him so well, that I cannot but recommend him to your care, who assuring me that he means to settle his fortunes there, I think it would be well done to admit him to be a planter upon the same conditions as others. So much for him.
     There is a Scottish proverb that bids you put two locks on your door, when you have made friends with a foe; so now upon this pacification, I bid you have a most careful eye upon the north of Ireland. Not that I think this caution is needful in respect of you, but to let you see I have a care of that kingdom, though I have too much trouble with these. So I rest
                                                  Your assured friend,
                                                                     Charles R.