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To Charles I.

My dear heart,                                                     March 1642/3

I was still expecting tidings from you before I sent any one, that I might know assuredly where you were. I hope this bearer will find you at York, although they say the contrary here; and that if you find York well affected, you will go to Hull, for we must have Hull. I am busy about sending you money, and I hope that soon it will be ready, but I would rather you had a place in England where I could send it to you. For this reason, I shall wait tidings from you, or Lord Newcastle, before I do it. I had written to you by my last letter, that it was necessary for you to have a sea-port, in case I wished to send a person to you, to speak with you, - but that is in case you can do it without retarding your affairs, for if you find the country where you are well affected, you will for the present remain in England, &c., that will be enough; it is not for fear, that you will be constrained to go away, but that it will not be in your power to stay in Newcastle. Wherefore, do not let that change your resolutions.

A report is current here, that you are returning to London, or near it. I believe nothing of it, and hope that you are more constant in your resolutions; you have already learned to your cost, that want of perseverance in your designs has ruined you. But if it be so, adieu; I must pray to God, for assuredly you will never change my resolution to retire into a convent, for I can never trust myself to those persons who would be your directors, nor to you, since you would have broken your promise to me. If you had wished to make an accommodation, you could have done it as well at York, and more to your advantage than near London. As you had decided on this at my starting, I cannot believe any other, although I confess I am troubled almost to death for fear of the contrary; and I have cause, for if you have broken your resolutions, there is nothing but death for me. I am afraid that it is a trick of Hamilton and Lanark together, for it is very public here that Lanark is betraying you. I pray God it be not so. If all that is said be true, you are lost, and I too; but if it be not, God be thanked; I have very great reason to fear Lanark. In God' name, beware of him, and trust yourself only to Culpepper, and to Ashburnham, for assuredly, they will not deceive you.

As to what concerns the affairs of Scotland, consult Lanark a little, in order not to excite his jealousy, and be constant in your resolutions, and I am assured that your affairs will go well, for I find the Prince of Orange here very affectionate towards you, and they have a little suspicion about your resolutions, and that you are not firm in your designs.

As I am writing this letter, I have just received one of yours, dated from Newmarket, which has brought me as much joy as the former news had caused me sadness, although I had assurance that you were in York, I have remarked that delays have never been to your advantage, although by the letter that I have received from Ashburnham, I have received the reasons, which have partially satisfied me, but more when he told me, that on Friday, you will be at York. Continue your resolution, and do not change, for therein is involved a blow for the party; and reflect, that it involves also whether you should go or not to Hull, and from thence to York: but to do that, you must be assured of Hull beforehand. This is why I shall wait for news from you with much impatience.

The money is not ready, for on your jewels, they will lend nothing. I am forced to pledge all my little ones, for the great ones, nothing can be had here, but I assure you I am losing no time. For the East Indian affairs, I refer you to Boswell to give you an account of them. You have been lately deceived in this: consult with the chancellor of the exchequer, about the requests with which he has to do, - and send us your directions. You can also speak to Will Murray, for he knows something about it. I will say no more on this subject.

If  I could send some one to you, he would tell you many things that I cannot send you word of. If you had Hull, I should be very glad, provided that did you no harm. Send me word, whether you will try it. I have written you three letters, one by Carnarvon, the others by Progers and Clarke, and have received four from you by Ringfield, two by the post, and one by a gentleman. I shall always conclude with, - lose no time, it is too dear; and you may listen far off, with more surety than near at hand.

Above all, do not leave Charles, and have him near you. Do not let him go out of your sight, for he is not so well attended that he has nothing to fear; for assuredly at this time everything is to be feared, I must tell you. Let your resolution serve you always, and above all, seek to continue the servants. I hope soon to see you again, which I assure you I desire no little. If my love were as sick as my body, I could not write, being extremely lame, but I hope that it will be only a cold. As to what you write me about Carnarvon, you may say, that at my return, if I find that her father and friends have served you, she shall see that on that account I shall be very glad to oblige her; but do not engage me quite, though she is a person of whom I have a very good opinion. I ever recommend to you, your care of your pockets. As to what I send you word about the journey of Digby, if you find it suitable, it must be kept very secret. I have sent away Pennington, and have kept a ship which that Scotchman commands le Cach, for it was necessary for Pennington to return, to command the fleet which is to go out, or they would have made it return by force. If an accommodation is proposed to you, I hope you will do nothing without telling me it.

Letter from Henrietta to Madame St. George.

Mammie St. George                                  1631

As the husband of my son's nurse is going to France, about some business of his wife, I write you this letter by him, believing that you will be very glad to ask him news of my son, whose portrait, which I sent to the queen my mother, I think you have seen. He is so ugly, that I am ashamed of him, but his size and fatness supply the want of beauty. I wish you could see the gentleman, for he has no ordinary mien; he is so serious in all that he does, that I canot help fancying him far wiser than myself.

Send me a dozen pairs of sweet chamois gloves, and also I beg you to send me one of doeskin; a game of joucheries, one of poule and the rules of any species of games now in vogue. I assure you, that if I do not write to you so often as I might, it is not because I have left off loving you, but because - I must confess it - I am very idle; also I am ashamed to avow that I think I am on the increase again; nevertheless, I am not quite certain. Adieu, the man must have my letter.

Who is Madame St. George?

Madame St. George or 'Mamie St. George' was  Jeanne de Harlay, only child of Madame de Montglat, Henrietta's former governess, who was maried, in 1599, to Hardouin de Clermont, Seigneur de St. George, and transmitted the barony of Montglat to her son, the memoir-writing Marquis de montglat. In 1610, Madame St. George, at the earnest request of the Queen, obtained permission from her husband, to assume the office of sub-governess to the princess Chretienne, with the proviso that she was to assist her mother generally in the charge of the children, and to take her place in case of illness of absence. She was aferwards more particularly attached to the service of Henrietta, between whom and herself there subsisted a warm and lasting friendship.                       

These were written during the King's absence in Scotland, when the King's commissioners were in charge of state affairs. Though the Queen was not the nominal head of the regency, by these letters you can see was the 'real' head.

Master Nicholas,

If you have received a letter from the King, or Sir Henry Vane, directed to the commissioners here, pray do not deliver it till I have spoken with you, for it was I that did desire the king to write it, and now I believe it is not fit to be delivered; therefore, keep it till I have seen you, if you should (have) received one, and so I rest

Your Friend,          Henrietta Maria R.   Outlands, this 18th August, 1641.

Master Nicholas,

I have received your letter, and that you sent me from the King, which writes me word, he has been very well received in Scotland, and that both the army and the people have showed a great joy to see the King, and such that they say was never seen before: pray God it may continue. For the letter that I wrote to you concerning the commissioners, it is that they are to dispatch business in the King's absence. I thank you for your giving me advices of what passes in London, and so I rest

Your Friend,           Henrietta Maria R. Outlands, the 19th August, 1641

Master Nicholas,

I send you the names of the lords that I think fit to be sent for. You must to advertise the bishop to be here, so having no more to say, I rest

Your assured Freind,   Henrietta Maria R.

Cumberland, Huntingdon, Bath, Northampton, Devonshire, Bristol, Newcastle, Paulet, Coventry, Seymour, Cottiington. If you would write to Bridgeman to come and to speak to all his friends in that country, his in Lancashire, and so to as many as are your friends; for many others, I have spoken myself to them already.

For Master Nicholas.   Endorsed 5th October, 1641

Master Nicholas,

I have received your letter. I am sorry you are not well, for I would have been glad to speak to you, but it is of no haste, therefore don't hasten yourself, for fear of being sick.

I send you a letter for my lord keeper, that the King did send to me, to deliver it if I thought it fit: the subject of it, is to make a declaration against the orders of parliament which are made without the King. If you believe a fit time, give it him: if not, you may keep it till I see you.

The King will be here certainly the 20th of this month, therefore you may advertise the mayor of London. Your letter that you did write to Carnarvon, is come back to me, and I burnt it. He was not at his house: it should be very necessary that you should enquire where he is, and write to him, and send to my Lord Cottington for his proxies, for I hear he has two, and his own; and send to my Lord Southampton and Dunsmore to send their proxies, till they come themselves: they are in Warwickshire. having no more to say, I rest this 12th November,

Your assured Freind,    Henrietta Marie R.  Endorsed 1641

Master Nicholas


I did desire you not to acquaint my Lord of Essex, of what the King commanded you, touching his coming: now you may do it, and tell him that the King will be at Theobald's, Wednesday, and shall lie there; and upon Thursday, he shall dine at my Lord Mayor's, and lie at Whitehall only for one night; and upon Friday, will go to Hampton Court, where he means to stay the winter: the king commanded me to tell this to my Lord of Essex, but you may do it, for these lordships are too great princes now to receive any direction from me. Being all that I have to say, I shall rest

Your assured Friend,   Henrietta Maria R.   Endorsed 20th Nov. 1641

In early February 1642 a packet of letters was intercepted by parliament from Lord Digby, one of which was to the Queen. Lord Digby was banished at the time.   The Queen went to Holland supposedly to take the princess Mary to her husband the Prince of Orange and partake of the much talked of Spa waters there. When there she gained the solid assistance of the Prince and raised money by pawning her own personal jewels and those of the the crown.

My dear heart,

It was with no small joy that I received your letter by Ringfield, for I was in the greatest anxiety. I thank God that Charles is with you, and that I perceive your resollution and constancy to continue. Assuredly, God will assist us, and whatever may be said to you, do not break your resolution, but follow it constantly and do not lose time. As to what you write me, about making Salisbury treasurer, I would do nothing in it yet, but  wait a while longer' for, as to the sum of money, it is too small to be considerable, and you know that it is a bone that will make the dogs fight, and you may gain more by the dissension that there will be amongst them than by the profit of the money, for this reason, do not dispose of it. As to sending you that money, I will make all possible diligence, but I do not know where to send it to you. Therefore when you come to York, if you find the country well affected, Hull must absolutely be had' if you cannot, you must go to Newcastle, and if you find that that is not safe, to to Berwick, for it is necessary to have a sea-port, for reasons that I will send to inform you of, by an express person, as soon as I shall know that you are at a sea-port, and that Charles (?) is there too, for it is necessary that this person should speak to you, before you go into Scotland. I will send him in your own ships, which I still keep, expecting news from you, and by that same way, I will send you some money; only send me a warrant, under your hand, to give to Pennington, to transport any person whom I shall appoint. You must leave the name of the person blank, and let me have it. Send to fetch James as soon as ever you can. I should also wish you to send for Essex and Holland to come and serve you. If they refuse, take away their places and keep them vacant, unless you came to some contest, else restore them as they were, provided that they serve you. Do not pass tonnage and poundage any more, for it is against yourself.

I am labouring with confidence, and hope to obtain satisfaction, although it be from a person not easy to bind down, but interests have great power. I had sent Clarke to you, but the wind has beeen so contrary that I do not think he has passed: which is the reason that by this way, I send you copies of what I sent by him, which is about what must be done to pawn our great collar, and touching my daughter, I think the way that must be taken is for you to send a command to Wharton, to get hiim to have a blank warrant drawn up very secretly by Bridgeman, and that Wharton himself should carry it to the keeper, with a letter from you, and have it sealed before him, and as such you will send it me with diligence, for otherwise we could do nothing as you will see by the letters of Boswell. Also send me a letter of warrant for Boswell, by which you command him to give up the collar to me, that if I see we can get nothing for it here, I may send it to your uncle. Send the letter to me, to make use of as I shall see fitting.

Be careful how you write in cipher, for I have been driven well nigh mad in deciphering your letter. You have added some blanks which I had not' and you have not written it truely. Take good care I beg you, and put in nothing which is not in my cipher. Once again I remind you to take care of your pocket, and not let our cipher be stolen, I am so weary with writing that I will say nothing other than kind, for I am more so than I could write, and I hope that my actions will show you it. If Pennington has not a warrant under your hand to stay with me till I inform him of your pleasure to the contrary, send me one, for I understand they want to play him an ill trick about it. He is too simple a man. It is his fault

Hague, 17th March 1642

To Charles I.           March 1642

My dear heart,

I was still expecting tidings from you before I sent any one, that I might know assuredly where you were. I hope this bearer will find you at York, although they say the contrary here; and that if you find York well affected, you will go to Hull, for we must have Hull. I am busy about swending you money, and I hope that soon it will be ready, but I would rather you had a place in England where I  could send it to you. For this reason, I shall wait tidings from you, or Lord Nescastle, before I do it. I had written to you by my last letter, that it was necessary for you to have a sea-port, in case I wished to send a person to you, to speak with you, - but that is in case you can do it without retarding your affaris, for if you find the country where you are well affected, you will for the preesent remain in England, &c., that will be enough; it is not for fear, that you will be constrained to go away, but that it will not be in your power to stay at Newcastle. Wherfore, do not let that change your resolutions.

A report is current here, that you are returning to London, or near it. I believe nothing of it, and hope that you are more constant in your resolutions; you have already learned to your cost, that want of perseverance in your designs has ruined you. But if it be so, adieu; I must pray to God, for assuredly you will never change my resolution to retire into a convent, for I can never trust myself to those persons who would be your directors, nor to you, since you would have broken your promise to me. If you had wished to make an accommodation, you could have done it as well at York, and more to your advantage than near London. As you had decided on this at my starting, I cannot believe any other, although I confess I am troubled almost to death for fear of the contrary; and I have cause, for if you have broken your resolutions, there is nothing but death for me. I am afraid that it is a trick of Hamilton and Lanark together, for it is very public here that Lanark is betraying you. I pray God it be not so. If all that is said be true, you are lost, and I too; but if it be not, God be thanked; I have very great reason to fear lanark. In God's name, beware of him, and trust yourself only to Culpepper, and to Ashburnham, for assuredly, they will not deceive you.
As to what concerns the affairs of Scotland, consult Lanark a little, in order not to excite his jealousy, and be constant in your resolutions, and I am assured that your affairs will go well, for I find the Prince of Orange here very affectionate towards you, only they have a little suspicion about your resolutions, and that you are not firm in your designs.

As I was writing this letter, I have just received one of yours, dated from Newmarket, which has brought me as much joy as the former news had caused me sadness, although I had assurance that you were in York, for I have remarked that delays have never been to your advantage, although by the letter that I have received from Ashburnham, I have received the reasons, which have partially satisfied me, but more when he told me, that on Friday, you will be at York. Continue your resolution, and do not change, for therein is involved a blow for the party; and reflect, that it involves also whether you should go or not to Hull, and from thence to York: but to do that, you must be assured of Hull beforehand. This is why I shall wait for news from you with much impatience.

The money is not ready, for on your jewels, that will lend nothing. I am forced to pledge all my little ones, for the great ones, nothing can be had here, but I assure you I am losing no time. For the East Indian affairs, I refer you to Boswell to give you an acount of them. You have been lately deceived in this: consult with the chancellor of the exchequer, about the requests with which he has to do, - and send us your directions. You can also speak to Will Murray, for he knows something about it. I will say no more on this subject.

If I could send some one to you, he would tell you many things that I cannot send you word of. If you had Hull, I should be very glad, provided that did you no harm. Send me word, whether you will try it. I have written you three letters, one by Carnarvon, the others by Progers and Clarke, and have received four from you by Ringfield, two by the post, and one by a gentleman. I shall always conclude with, - lose no time, it is too dear; and you may listen far off, with more surety than near at hand.

Above all, do not leave Charles, and have him near you. Do not let him go out of your sight, for he is not so well attended that he has nothing to fear; for assuredly at this time everything is to be feared, I must tell you. Let your resolution secure you always, and above all, seek to continue the servants. I hope soon to see you again, which I assure you I desire no little. If my love were as sick as my body, I could not write, being extremely lame, but I hope that it will be only a cold. As to what you wtire me about Carnarvon, you may say, that at my return, if I find that her father and friends have served you, she shall see that on that acount I shall be very glad to oblige her; but do not engage me quite, though she is a person of whom I have a very good opinion. I ever recommmend to you, your care of your pockets. As to what I send you word about the journey of Digby, if you find it suitable, it must be kept very secret. I have sent away Pennington, and have kept a ship which that Scotchman commands le Cach, for it was necessary for Pennington to return, to command the fleet which is to go out, or they would have made it return by force. If an accomodation is proposed to you, I hope you will do nothing without telling me it.   The Queen of Bohemia comments 'the Queen is against any agreement with parliament but by war, and the king dogh nothing but by her approbation;' She also says 'I find by all the queen's and her people's discourse that they do not desire an agreement betixt his majesty and the parliament, but that all be done by force, and rail abominably at the parliament. I hear all and say nothing'.


The Queen to Charles writes:

My dear heart,

It was with no small joy that I received your letters, for you were arrived at York a fortnight before I received tidings from you, but all at once I have had two newspapers. Sir William Baladin having been driven back by the tempest three times, the other at last overtook him, and they came together. I am extremely glad to hear that you have been so well received at York, and that you find the country so well affected. Take advantage of it, and lose no time; you know that the affection of the peoploe changes like the wind, therefore you should make good use of it whilst it lasts; you have a precedent before you, for the parliament will make use of it.

As to what you write me, that everybody dissuades you concerning Hull from taking it by force, unless the parliament begins, -- is it not beginning to put persons into it against your orders? If you wait for it to be done publicly otherwise than that, you will be ruined altogether, and as for the assurance that you have of Scotland, I have many doubts about it, for I hear that Argyle and the others, who I believe are rather for the Parliemant, have regiments on foot to go to  Ireland. Believing that you are going to Scotland, they design to have their people on foot, in order to make them now do what they wish. Take good care about it, and try to dispatch them to Ireland before going, if it be possible. If you have the people of Yorkshire, as assured to you as you found, take advantage of it, whilst they are in good temper: at the beginning, people can do thiings, about which, in the end, they grow cool, and then they can no longer be done. There is no more room for repentance. For my part, I think that the parliament believes that you are constantly expecting an accomodation,  in fact, that they draw back themselves perhaps to what they would desire, if they saw you in action, and that else, perhaps they would speak after another fashion. For you having Hull is not beginning anything violent, for it is against the rascal who refuses it to you.

As to money, I am at work: I must send into Denmark, for in the mean time, they will lend nothing upon your rubies. Nevertheless, I will put all my jewels in pledge; but as to you, when that is done, and you have expended that money, still waiting till the Parliament declares war against you, there will be no further means of getting other monies, and thus you will be reduced to do what the Parliament shall and I shalll be constrained to retire into a convent, or to beg alms. Also it is to be feared that the Parlament will Take a path more moderate in appearance, but in effect, worse for you; wherefore, that ought to be well considered. A  report is current here, that you will grant the militia for one year, but your letter relieves me from that fear, for you assure me of the contrary. Continue in your resolutions; and pardon me if I have written a little too much on this subject by Ringfield. My whole hope lies only in your firmness and constancy, and when I hear anything to the contrary, I am mad. Pardon once again my folly and weakness: I confess it. That letter of which you speak to me, and which you sent me concerning an accommodation, is so insupportable, that I have burnt it with joy. Such a thing is not to be thought of; it is only trifling and losing time. Think that if you had not stopped so prematurely, our affairs would perhaps be in a better state than they are, and you would at this moment have Hull. This is only as an example of what I say, and not to reproach you, for that is over. As to your having passed tonnage and poundage, I confess that it is against my opinion, for it is only for them and not for you--but I submit.

As to what has been told you that Cognet has sent word to her husband concerning Digby, it is a very great lie, for I can assure you that she only wrote about her private affairs, and about her mother, all whose goods the Parliament has arrested, their only ground being that she carried away all my jewels. As to Digby, I assure you that he has no intention of returning to England; he finds himself very comfortable where he is. It is true I have heard him say that if the Parliament wished to accuse him, and that he could defend himself without being sent to prison, he was so innocent that he would venture to go to defend himself; but it was with the intention that incase he went to see you, and were taken at see, he might say that he was going to justify himself to the Parliament; but now, since you do not think it proper, he will not venture it. As to the ambassador who is to go from this country, I had a long conversation wit him yesterday. I think he is a very honest man: you have seen him before; he is a tall man, who kissed the hands of jeffry, taking him for my son. As to Isabelle she cannot go with him; for she is too much suspected to be of your party.


I hear no news of the commission which I wrote to you to send, concerning my daughter and the rest. Please not to forget. I have received the addition of the cipher. I have nothing more to say except ever to urge upon you constancy and resolution: for it must be by these that we emerge from our miseries. I expect many lords have come to you. Beware of the persecutions of some: I name no one, but assuredly you will well understand me. It is not only for Hamiltion that I speak, but for other yet, who you know are addicted to the commission, and who are come to join you. Since you are there, you miust above all try to have a safe sea-port, for without that, you can have no correspondence with me, nor can I send you money. If you are forced to get Hull by force, assuredly you will need some powerful aid for besieging places. The Prince of Orange will send some if you wish it. As fast as I write, something Always comes into my head; but adieu, I have such a bad tooth-ache that I scarcely know what I am doing.

The hague, this 16th April.

To Charles I.                May, 1642

My dear heart,

After much trouble, we have at last procured some money, but only a little as yet, for the fears of the merchants are not yet entirely passed away. It was written from London, that I had carried off my jewels secretly, and against your wish, and that if money was lent me upon them that would be no safety for them; so that all this time, when we were ready to conclude anything, or merchants always drew back. At last, it was necessary to show your power, signed under your own hand, about which I have written to you before, and immediately we concluded our business. I thought it better and safer to send it you as I do without noise, than for you to send different persons to fetch the money, for it will not be known that it will be for you, and as much, and as little at once, as you please. I thought this way more assured than to send it in specie, for were you to change your place, the money of this country would not pass, and in money of England we couldn't not get it. I have given up your pearl buttons, and my little chain has done you good. You cannot imagine how handsome the buttons were, when they were out of the gold, and strung into a chain, and many as large as my great chain. I assure you, that I gave them up with no small regret. Nobody would take them in pledge, but only buy them. You may judge, now, when they know that we want money, how they keep their foot on our throat. I could not get for them more than half of what they are worth. I have six weeks time in which to redeem them, at the same price. My great chain, and that cross wiich I had bought from the queen my mother is only pledged. With all these, I could not get any more money than what I send you. I will send to-morrow to Antwerp, to pawn your ruby collar, for as to that, in Holland, they will not have it. For the largest collar, I am waiting a reply from Denmark. Every day, hopes are given me that those of Amsterdam will lend me money.

This is all that concerns money: but if we put all our jewels in pledge, and consume them without doing anything, they would be lost, and we too; for we should have nothing left to help ourselves with, when we should need it. For this reason, lose no time; you have lost enough already. Take a good resolution and pursue it. Remember your own maxims, that it is better to follow out a bad resolution, than to change it so often. I have received your letters by the man already named - they have made me very sad, for you do not speak of giving up your magazine as lost. I must tell you again, that you see that if at first you had acted as you had resolved, it might have been gained at this time, and also, since you had once tried to get it, it was needful to go on; for to begin, and then to stop, is your ruin - experience shows it you. It is not enough to declare yourself in writing; actions must afterwards be seen. It is true that your game is yet fair enough, but if you do not play it well, it willl not be gained. You must dare, and as to Hull, if your magazine is not yet out of it, you must play Hotham some skilful trick, for otherwise, there is nothing to hope. As long  as you do not declare yourself, you cannot judge of your power, for no one will dare to declare himself. And think too, that I am risking all we have left in the world to get money, and that, when that money fails, there is not more, and that when it will be needful to pay persons for fithing, there will be no more; wherefore, time is precious. I am very glad that you have commanded.

To Charles I

My dear heart,

The wind having been contrary, so that Sir Baladin has not been able to cross, and having received letters from you by Cochram, in which I see you are not certain of your voyage to Ireland, I wished to write you this line, still sending what I had written before,  and which I beleive you will have already received also by another road. I will reply to your letter, where you say that if you can go to Ireland, and that the road by England is not safe, that you will to go Ireland by Scotland, which is a road that I apprehend extremely; for the troops who are going are entirely devoted to the Parliament, and they will hold you as a prisoner, if the Parliament please: thus you cannot join the army of the Catholics nor approach Dublin by that road; I think that by Wales would be the most sure, if that country is well affected. You can always raise men enough there for a regiment for your person, as was your design, and to leave thence you have a ship for Ireland, of which you can make use; and be assured of Stradlin, and also of him whom I have with me, and indeed those of the fleet, who are well affected, and make them come on some pretext. If you were assured that the troops who should go to Ireland are going very soon. and Scotland would remain without these persons who are not well affected to you, Scotland would be a good place for you to go to, but whilst these devils are there, there is no safety; and do you think that the Parliament having refusined for you to go, that the troops will let you go? I am much afraid lest this affair of the militia spoil your design. I pray God that you may refuse it.

I do not write to Lanark for you send me word that he is not there; if he be, you will tell him the reason why I do not do so.

As to the man whom you ask for, I pray you send a warrant under your hand to Santerre, who commands the ship which is here, to wait my orders; for the warrant he has is under the hand of Pennington, and at this time, that cannot serve him. Also a letter for the king of Denmark, only of ceremony, like that you gave me before, and send me a copy of it, to make use of, if it be necessaary. If you have already done it, you must send it me again. Adieu, my dear heart.

This 5th may

To the king, my lord.

To Charles I

1642

My dear heart,
     I have received your letter by the post, with the message that the Parliament has sent you, which I think is pretty fair, since they believe they can have every thing by speaking high words. As to your journey into Ireland, I say nothing about it, having written on that subject before; but as to the discourse you have had with Culpepper (?) about Hull, I must say in truth, that to me it is a strange thing, that there is any one who can argue against tahat, and that you have not attempted to get it already; for the longer you wait, the worse it will be: and believe, that if there come a fleet to fetch away the arms, you will be able to hinder it? If, before that, you do not get the place, the folly is so great, that I do not understand it. Delays have always ruined you. As to your answer on the militia, I would believe that you will not consent to pass it for two years, as I undersand you will be pressed to do, and that you will refuse it. But perhaps, it is already done; you are beginning again your old game of yielding everything. For my own consolation, however, I will hope the contrary, till I hear the decision; for I confess that if you do it, you ruin me in ruining yourself; and that, could I have believed it, I should never have quitted England; for my journey is rendered ridiculous by what you do, having broken all the resolutions that you and I had taken,  except of going where you are, and that to do nothing. If you had been willing to cede the militia when I was in England, I could have satisfied the Parliament, as I said; but you have done in this, I am afraid, as you did in the affair of the bishops; for at one time, you could have entered into an accommodation about that, and you were obstinate that you could not, and after all, you yielded it. Meanwhile, I went out of England, contrary to every body's opinion, in the confidence I had of what you would do, and I have made myself riiculous; whereas, if you had done as you had resolved, it would have been seen that what you yielded all that time, was only our of fear of danger to my person, and from your affection to me, and not for want of resolution, and that I had been in the right to go away: whereas hitherto there is ground for believing that it is a vagary or a folly; for as for staying in York, without doing anything, I might have done that.
     Forgive me for constrained by my misfortunes, to retire to soome place where I can pray to God for you. I understand they are willing to give you tonnage and poundage for three years. I repeat to you, that if you cannot have it as you ought, that is to say, in your own power to dispose of it, you pass a thing against yourself: you see it by experience, for all that  has been hitherto done with it, has been against you. As to what you write me, concerning the 7000 pieces, I will not fail to send them.
     As to the esquire of James, the man to whom you have promised it is Mr. ______, He was a cornet of Henry Percy's company, a gentleman of worth. I think that for the present, one in that place is enough. I send you this man express, hoping that you will not have passed the militia bill. If you have, I must think about retiring for the present, into a convent, for you are no longer capable of protecting any one, not even yourelf.
    Adieu, my dear heart.
The Hague, this 11th May.

As I was closing this letter, arrived Sir Louis Dives, who has told me all that has passed at Hull. Do not lose courage, and continue to act with resolution, for now is the time to shew that you will make good what you have undertaken, or you are lost. You must have Hull, and if the man who is in it does not submit, you have already declared him a traitor, you must have him alive or dead; for this is no longer a mere play. You must declare yourself; you have testified your gentleness enough, you must shew your justice. Go on boldly: God will assist you. You see what you have got by not following your first resolutions, when you declared those of the parliament traitors. Let that serve you as an ensample; do not delay longer now in consulations, it is action which must do the work at this hour; -- it is time. I have wished myself in the place of James in Hull; I would have flung the rascal over the walls, or he should have done the same thing to me.
     As to money, Goring is gone to hasten it. He doubts not of having it in a week. I am in such haste to dispatch this bearer that I will say no more, nor write to any one else in the world. Courage! I never felt so much: it is a good omen. You must go on boldly in case of need; the time is come, since I see that there is no hope of an accommodation. May heaven load you with as many benidictions as you have had afflictions, and may those who are the cause of your misfortunes, and those of your kingdom, perish under the load of their damnable intentions!